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. i plan to vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now weakening. this would be a terrible signal to send at a time when putin is in the process of imposing ever tighter restrictions on all opposition to his regime, especially democratic activists and any others who
outspoken about human rights in russia. "she has been traveling with a business contingent of her trip has not just been about the euro. the ruble. >> they passed a resolution that underscored fears about the kremlin's commitment. >> vladimir putin as an less than happy to hear the criticism. clutched kendel merkel was expecting a chilly reception and. >> at a joint conference with business leaders, questions from the audience quickly turned to what many here see as an increasingly critical tone that germany and europe are taking with russia. >> she was surprisingly candid in her assessment. >> she said, we are concerned and it is my view as well that the kremlin has adopted a series of laws that do not do anything to promote principles such as the right of political groups to organize freely. she highlighted the two-year prison sentence given to members of the rock band pussy riot as a decision europeans could not understand. he said they were not track actively suppress civil society and talked about the growing tensions. he said, we disagree, arguing, and search for compromise but there
between germany and russia by some measures is at its worst in decades. has there been a real break down between russia and the west as pew ten has come back into office? >> i don't believe there's been a break down. i think the perception of russia has been difficult from western investors. when you see human rights case come up, people get a bit more nervous. but general employeeliemployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayl emplo russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayemploye russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todaymployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayployee a is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayloyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayoyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayyee i f st
and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. europe is the western extremity of the eurasian supercontinent, and most changes in europe over the millennium have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull -- bulgaria are right next door to russia, russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than bangladesh. it's been invaded by poles, lithuanians, swedes. french, germans over the centuries, so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian evil giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is o impe his ne-yo imperialism is o imp function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the
edge -- >> questions to editor she mentioned the cold war. the request and asking what role does russia play in the world going forward. >> it is -- in a challenge of the finding its identity under totally different circumstances. russia has been an imperial power and it has had domestic support by its efforts in asia, the middle east and europe, depending on where it was, now russia has the problem of a declining population. declining russian population and muslim population that is forward of the muslim world. 3,000 miles from china which is based tricky dick nightmare in the sense that there are thirty million russians are on one side and 1 billion chinese on the other end the middle east which is an ideological nightmare and in europe, a historically difficult one for them so how -- and yet the image russia has of its leadership is that they have to be considered as a principal country in order to be taken seriously so fundamentally russia has to look for a pattern of cooperation but found methods of doing it but russia is not strategic to the west, bringing pressure on its neighbor
now in terms of how will it be taken forward with russia and china? will there be confrontation? the question that's going to be asked and needs to be asked is because strategy is needed is to go to the russians and say basically, now what do you want? the president is there for four more years, no more elections, what is it that you want? deliver what the russians or not? cold war they want or what is -- what consequences of that? from what i understand the foreign minister of russia was meeting with the gulf ministers, the gcc ministers, i, from what my information is he did not give in. they are standing exactly where they were. this is not -- the strategy is needed. it is not a strategy, and the u.s., no matter how much we try to run away from that situation in syria and israel and iran, it's, yeah, light footed or heavy footed, leadership is needed. >> one follow-up question. do you see the current situation, you talked about the instability and opportunity as they say in america, an opportunity to change the channel. is it likely an opportunity for assad to change the chan
that more caution is still advise. >> in russia, speculation is rife about the health of vladimir putin. this after the russian president canceled his traditional end of the year call-in show. >> he was also seen living in public. the kremlin says he's fine, but not everyone is convinced. >> in these images from state television, putin seems to be in discomfort. >> i read something on the internet, but i do not think he is seriously ill. everyone has the odd a campaign. >> by september, putin had a noticeable limp. the kremlin said he had pulled a muscle doing judo. >> that is something putin has painstakingly avoided in his 30 years as russia's most powerful politician. he has always been keen to project an image of himself as a virile and vulnerable leader. >> putin will do anything to say in power. anyone who has power clings to it. >> another source of pain might be the latest opinion polls. they suggest that only 15% of russians approve of the way he is running the country. >> well, some sports news now. in formula one racing, sebastian fettle will be looking to take another step t
and acquitted. two croatian generals are walking free. and the brutal life as a slave in modern russia. >> the shop owner between a lot and hit me once nonstop for hours and even she hit me when i was pregnant. she had no mercy. london, 7:00y in a.m. in washington, and it's 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem and gaza, where the egyptian prime minister has called for immediate intervention to bring about an end to the violence which he has blamed on israel. he held a meeting with the hamas prime minister in gaza and there's a truce. israel says 50 rockets were fired into southern israel in that time and it launched further strikes on gaza in return. sirens have been sounded in tel aviv where two rockets were fired on the city. now to an israeli border town to join my colleague ben. >> rockets have been fired into this town a few kilometers from israel-gaza border. the sirens sounded five minutes ago. before that, an hour ago. normally the rockets are intercepted by the israel anti- missile shield, but one of them did get through to my lef andt and landed in open ground, not injuring anyone. two hav
meaningful contributions now? the contribution does not have to be militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say ab
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
in syria. we've seen three security council vetoes by russia and china causing many to call the u.n., essentially, ineffective in this crisis. so it's been the interplay of these three factors, i would argue, that has led syria down the path that it has taken. in terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the objective of having assad, as president obama called for, step aside. this was back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is that it has continually been at conflict with itself in terms of how to achieve that objective while also achieving or protecting u.s. national security interests in the region. namely, i would argue, very understandable concerns about, about the impact of unseating assad and the potential for massive instability across the region. so at the crux of u.s. policy on syria, i would argue, has resided this tension of wanting assad to go but being concerned and fearful about how to achieve that objective while also seeking to maintain stability in such a volatile region of the world. now, the debate right now on syria is focused largely on this
is referring to russia, that the great bear will attack israel but also have other allies. iran will be one of those. bible describes there is going to be so much bloodshed that the blood will rise as high as the horses bridle. many people believe there is a rapture, that jesus will appear in the clouds that christians from all over the world will be taken up into the heavens. then there will be seven year period. at the end of the seven years, the battle of armageddon and jesus will come back and he will stand upon the mounted of olives. after that, thousand year reign of christ. >> reporter: we'll be there to capture the second coming. >> any time people can go on our website and when the end comes. day star will be there. >> some people say it's going to happen on this date and this is how it is going to happen. >> and prediction who will win the battle of good and evil? >> i do believe good is going to win. not because i'm hopeful but history has shown this. >> bill: nobody knows how the end will come while doomsday believers have made an industry out of scaring people with predictions.
by china, russia and iran that would give the united nations control over the internet. we'll see what this week's u.n. vote could mean for your usage of the net here in america. >>> and a victim of superstorm sandy who got a personal promise from the president, now speaking out and calling the president's trip to new jersey, a big waste of time. >>> as we await the white house press briefing the senate bracing itself for possible confirmation hearings on u.s. ambassador susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. the buzz on this is growing but could the benghazi debacle sink her chances and should it? we'll have a fair and balanced debate on that next. >> i think if he does, it could be, that kind of arrogance which is what i think it would be could be his undoing, because if she is put under oath and forced to go through and answer all these questions about benghazi i think it will put the administration in a really bad position ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting u
, china, france, germany, russia, known as the p5+1, and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. of sides have fumbled the opportunities to reduce the risks of nuclear-armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, the u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable, meaning that iran has a scientific, technical and industrial capacity to eventually produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran will require several months to acquire enough this'll material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. secretary of defense and a estimate it would take two to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichm
, but you are engaging with countries for whom doing that is much simplerlike china, like russia, the state capital company where, you know, your company is your arm not only of foreign economic policy, but of foreign policy full stop. how do you operate in a world with players who are operating under these very different rules? >> well, it's something we do spend quite a bit of time thinking about this. it's not all about china. there are issues with other countries like -- >> russia? >> -- like russia, but not just those two. and the lines are really blurred in terms of where the state ends and where capital and corporate interests begin for many countries. at the state department, we've really tried to create mechanisms through multilateral institutions like the oecd has come up with a platform for competitive neutrality which looks at the different ways that governments can act to subsidize or to give favor to their own state-owned or state-led interests and provide some recommendations for engaging in a platform of competitive neutrality. it's a different way of thinking about the chal
, this group from russia has come in, or this group of jews have come in. i'm sorry, but we're taking this mountain." i mean, we heard over and over, "you see that community up there on that hill? well, a year ago, that was arab territory." there's still this business of, "sorry, you have to move on." and when you think about the situation of the indigenous peoples of this continent and how, "well, here's your reservation. no, i'm going to move further"- they're still getting pushed around, and that's messing with their mind, ethically. yeah, janet? >> right now what they're doing, i think, is they're refusing construction permits for palestinian houses, so you can't add a room addition on to your house while they're building those new subdivisions for the other people. so they're squeezing them that way- they're saying, "well, we don't care if your son or daughter got married and now you need more- no, you can't build onto your house." >> and as virginia said, it's not having rights, and without rights, you can't obey your obligations, you can't obey your responsibilities, and it put
blast of cold air coming in out of eastern china, also eastern russia here. you see all that cloud cover coming in. well, that's actually producing some snowfall on top of what you already saw over the weekend in portions of northern honshu, even off towards hokkaido. it's not just the snowfall here. some severe weather is erupting along the cold front. you could be seeing strong to thunderstorms here, even a tornado or two cannot be completely ruled out with this storm system as it continues to push overhead. the good news, it is pushing off to the east and much of western japan, even on the east coast around tokyo, you're going to be seeing drier weather in place mainly due to a high pressure continuing to ridge in fro the west, actually across much of china you're already seeing fair weather in place here. that cold air from the north is creating dense and heavy fog. do slow down on the roads if you're out there driving about. but some afternoon thunderstorms still going to be popping up here and also down towards the philippines and the indochina peninsula. for the tropics, temperatu
. but for the moment, russia's president might be better off putting his feet up and taking it easy for a while. there have been rumors about his health for months. the kremlin has reportedly canceled several foreign trips and anonymous government sources put the blame on mr. putin's babaji back. now those terms -- dodgy back. now those rumors have been confirmed. >> he likes to wrestle. i told him, you cannot do this anymore. what do you want, to do professional wrestling somewhere or what? and he says, well, i just like to drag around on inaccurate he was wrestling -- on a mac. he was wrestling and when he threw him over, he twisted his spine. >> there have been claims that some of his adventures were staged. this is an ally of the president. they have had their moments of closeness as well as their spats. he was an award -- he was awarded a studio just two spots from the highest award of the national federation. it is hoped that the promised game of hot ice hockey does not come even more -- become even more physical. gregg's a now to some research from -- >> and now to some research from an
arab ya and the united states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shif
. revelations 20 about the balance of gog and mahgog g referring to russia that the great bear will attack israel but will have other allies, iran will be one of those. the bible describes there is going to be so much bloodshed that the blood will rice as high as the horse's bridle. many people believe that there is a rapture that jesus will appear in the clouds and that the christians from all over the world will be taken up into the heavens and then there will be a seven year period, at the end of that seven year the battle of armageddon, jesus will come back and he will stand upon the mount of olive, after that the thousand year reign of christ over the earth. we have a live 24 hour camera feed any time day or night people can go on our website, when the end comes, day star will be there. >> some say it is going to happen on this date and this is how. the text is not that detailed. >> most welcome prediction about who will win the balance of good and evil. >> i believe that good is going to win that is not because i'm hopeful, but because history has shown us. >>> no one knows if or how
coming in from russia, switzerland and france under the mantle of the palestinian authorities are going to open the grave this coming week. they're going to take samples and shut the grave again on the same day. it's a very emotional day for palestinians because he is this overarching palestinian figure, but also a very, very interesting and almost exciting forensic case as well, victor. >> we know that the investigative committee held a news conference a short time ago. what more are we learning about how they're moving forward? >> reporter: well, they said they're moving forward in a way that, first of all, they pushed back the date for when the grave was going to be opened. they then went through the motions how all of this is going down. they said there's going to be a very ceremonial opening of the grave, then they're going to take the samples and then arafat is going to be laid to rest again with a religious ceremony and a military ceremony as well. that's sort of the process that's going to go on. what's going to happen is these three forensic teams, the russian, french and swiss
to let countries control the internet contact in their own borders. russia is backing that. some arab countries are pushing for identification of all internet users. some developing nations are asking to be have individual websites pay to reach users across internal borders. changes to the open internet policy could three new sensorship and give new ammunition to countries that try to silence critics in iran or china. the united states government opposes all the changes. as do tech giants like google, facebook, and microsoft. officials with the u.n. group say this has nothing to do with sensorship but they want to update the country treaty which has stayed the same since 1988 long before the internet became such a household term. long before we used it. and now the counterterrorism and computer crime analyst who is live with us this afternoon. you start reading this stuff and it is this weird soup. what, exactly, are they doing? >>guest: well, this is atlas shrugged. they are trying to do it under "we want to tax" and it is certain things about revenue and the sender pays but it boils
efforts to persuade russia d china to work with us at the u.n. security council. i will take every opportunity to urge my russian and chinese colleagues to support the political and diplomatic solution to the conflict in syria. without such a solution everything that they and we most fear is coming closer, including ever-greater loss of life, instability in neighboring countries and an opportunity for extremists to pursue their own ends. the basis for such a political settlement is clear: a credible alternative to the assad regime is emerging that has the growing support of the arab league, the european union, the united states and an in's cooing number -- increasing number of countries, and we have an agreed basis for transition which all permanent members of the u.n. security council signed up to in june. but in the absence of that political and diplomat you can solution, we will not rule out any option, and in accordance with international law where it might save innocent lives in syria and prevent the destabilization of a region that remains critical to the security ofhe united
the world war iii. host: let's go to russia. before the elections, president obama was heard on a hot microphone telling dmitry medvedev that he would have more flexibility after the election. what was he referring to? host: -- guest: romney is sent one of his sons to speak to one of the aids of vladimir putin. policy someone gets frozen during an election. russian policy, in particular. president who was prime minister during that time and now is president again. the relationship with russia has been somewhat fractious lately. secretary of state hillary clinton accused the russians of ridding their election. there were concerned for these popular protests in moscow where there was great oppression by the government and who lashed out at the united states as well. -- and putin lashed out. one of the earlier policies was for a russian reset, and attempted to take a relationship that was good at one. that had turned very fractious and taken from a basic transactional relationship, just dealing with things as they came out, to building a new, strategic relationship in russia. that has so
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
in the countries, brazil, russia, india, bringing in europe, and do real nation building through economic means so you don't end up having a cold war with china or russia or entering a new gray war with al qaeda or intervention in syria or war with iran. let us hope those are not the foreign policy markers of a second term. he has a chance here. not for cold war with china, but to rebuild because china's going through terrible social instability, economic growth is plummeting. a whole series of issues to unit. >> it's worth mentioning the president announced the return of the u.s. to the tune of 170 million for projects over the next two years and that is something i'm sure the burmese welcome with open arms, but at the end of the day i think he probably could have gone with empty hands and still receive the reception he had which was people flooding the streets. reports of six and seven people deep on the sidewalks as his motorcade passed by. >> that's right. china has been offering a lot of cash, doing a lot of projects there. a lot of chinese business people in burma. china very much wants acce
. experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains also looking for a possible pulonium concentration. the samples will be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france, and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yassir arafat remains a towering figure for palestinians. but despite wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. i don't support the exhumation process, this man says. because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him, as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> reporter: of course, i am against it, he says. it is insulting to the martyr and to the palestinian people. the palestinian authority has accused israel of being behind any poisoning of arafat. a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it's not clear if pelonium can be traced eight years after the palestinian leader's death. but if heightened levels are found, the next
the experts from russia, france, and switzerland join the palestinians in taking specimens of yasser arafat's remains. they're going to study those specimens in their laboratories in their countries. they say it will take three months to get a full result. and then they'll know how he died. now the claims that he was murdered, if he was murdered, he was poisoned, became -- well, you know, for eight years, no one really dealt with the issue until al jazeera tv earlier this year did a documentary reporting that they have confirmed that he died of poisoning of plutonium 210, the same allegedly used to kill a spy turned can dissident. if he was poisoned with with mew tone yum, who did it? if it turns out he was poisoned, they need to find out who did it and that's a whole different investigation. i guess it becomes a criminal investigation as opposed to this kind of medical examination. >> and, martin, who is doing this investigation right now? who is in charge of this decision to exhume his body? >> reporter: well, you know, there was great pressure after that al jazeera documentary on arafat'
statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's a cyberdefense center both selection. estonia is the most connected country in europe. they are a leader in the government. that's when of the reasons why estonia is super interesting. i don't know how much my time -- am i good? >> you are good. >> i'm going to spend a couple minor on other ones. okay, so there's lots of incidents in my side of e-mail, targeted attacks to u.s. satellites. it looks like someone from china. i'm not saying chinese government, but someone through china for mr. cheney servers appear to have been doing the proof of concept. they were trained to see whether they could get him into the
multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. while the post ponement for a year is a positive sign, it's not enough to ensure u.s. operators won't be n
forensic teams from switzerland, france and russia. the results of the investigation aren't expected for several months but arafat's body will immediately be reburied with full military honors. palestinians are convinced israel supplied the poison. this man is more interested if they had help from palestinian collaborators. >> reporter: in the meantime his image remains useful. it held pride of place at a demonstration today to support a bid to gain observer status at the united nations for the palestinian state arafat spent his life trying to create two days after he was to be dug up and reburied. allen pizzey, cbs news, ramallah. >> glor: the investigation continues tonight after a terrible fire at a garment factory in bangladesh. officials say there were no emergency exits so panicked workers jumped from windows. some as high as eight stories up as the fire spread. so far at least 112 people are known to have died. in this country retailers are hoping for strong sales this holiday season. consumers are expected to spend nearly 750 dollars on average, this year. that's up nearly $9
, france, and russia. the results of the investigation aren't expected for several months but arafat's body will be immediately reburied with full military honors. palestinians are convinced israel supplied the poison. bedali is more interested in finding out if they had help from palestinian collaborators. >> a body has to be respected. we should know who did it and i don't think that by taking of his body they will know it. >> reporter: in the meantime, his image remains useful. it held pride of place at a demonstration to support a bid to gain observer status at the united nations for the palestinian state arafat spent his life trying to create two days after he was to be dug up and reburied. allen pizzey, cbs news, ramallah. >>> in massachusetts, officials are blaming a utility worker for a massive natural gas explosion. the blast friday night injured 18 people and damaged 42 buildings in springfield. the state fire marshal says the worker was responding to a gas leak when he accidentally punctured an underground pipe. and immediately called the fire department. >>> coming up mention, y
: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly working hard to prove the point. that is next. it up tomorrow, abc news white house correspondent with his new book. we will be talking about that. former federal prosecutor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations among our guests. coming right up, the "a-team" on the republican rebellion against what. who is this guy? grover norquist -- grover norquist. suddenly being blamed for everything. the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone...but her likes 50% more cash. but i'm upping my game. do you want a candy cane? yes! do you want the puppy? yes! do you want a tricycle? yes! do you want 50 percent more sh? no! ♪ festive. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. what's in your wallet? ♪ lou:
.s. intelligence has identified three command and control servers. one is in russia and one in the states that are sending commands to this virus and the u.s. intelligence has now at a later concluded with a high degree of confidence that this virus was developed by state-sponsored actors in excess land, and not in the high degree of confidence that there is a shadow out there that they have another target and that this virus is not going to stay on the leal companies that could move -- oil companies that could move. if you want to start? >> i think so, given the "washington post" sources we don't have to worry about. [laughter] but now i think one, the general realization that we have not seen everything yet sold, second, typical of the cyber type of activities they are probably most crippling in undermining confidence over the public so they need courses of action to address this in the public and how they will do this we haven't really gotten the sense of the external overseas type of the implications from the standpoint of other damage out there. we need to know from the intelligence
cost investments. ♪ >>> a couple other stories we're following this morning, russia's space agency has denied it lost communication with the international space station after a cable broke outside moscow. the story was first reported on state run news agency saying the broken kibl meant russia had lost the ability to control most of its civilian satellites. a spokesman was quick to assure that despite the broken cable, satellites and the station were continuing to operate normally. he also said the agency was able to communicate with the satellites and control them. plenty more coverage on this story at cnbc.com. further israeli strikes have killed three palestinians in the southern gaza strip this as three were killed in an auntment building in central israel, the first israeli fatalities since israel relaunched an offensive against gaza a day earlier. and the latest action came as the u.n. security council held an emergency meeting in new york to discuss the escalation of violence in the region. yesterday israel killed hamas' top military commander during air strikes. condemnation of
to be happening. so what's going to happen is that this coming tuesday the investigators from france, russia, as well as switzerland, are going to open yasser arafat's grave. they are going to take samples from yasser arafat ebody, and then they are going to shut the grave as well. all of this will have big ceremonial character. there will be a religious ceremony when the grave is opened. there will be a military ceremony, and the same is going to be happening when yasser arafat is laid to rest again. the whole thing, they say, is all going to happen in one day, so it won't take very long, but what the palestinian authority has left open is how long the actual investigation of the samples is going to take. all of the samples are separately going to be taken to russia, france and switzerland, to the labs there, to be analyzed, and it's unclear how long this analysis is going to take. however, if it does come to light that yasser arafat was indeed poisoned with the radioactive substance polonium that will, of course, cause massive emotional reactions here. and already the investigation is a ve
to be ready to go to the mat to make sure the assad regime will stay in power. that is russia and iran. the result could be an assad that stays in power, an iranian victory that will mark the good for our efforts to move iran to the negotiating table on nuclear weapons, and, in wide portions of syria, and no man's land like the somalia were militants associate with al-qaeda will find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage through military means of necessary directly or indirectly providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more urgently and this thing will slip out of control. at best, in syria, we will see an emerging shia-sunni fissure across the middle east that will be followed by fighting. but a touch on iraq -- it has not received too much commentary you -- either in the debates in the campaign or even in some of the discussions about the post-election foreign policy priority but it needs to be a priority for several reasons. iraq is a success. it is because of the efforts of the united states and o
on in the distribution of the economy and china, conditions in russia. there are a number of problems anew environment. we have not developed a coherent approach because in the first term you learn your job. that is the challenge that the administration is facing. >> people look to the united states for leadership. they look to us because we have for so long been in a position where we've been able because of our resources and military strength, because of our values, we've been able to keep the peace. we have been able to make sure that enemies feared us and make sure allies could count on us. with we step back as we did during president obama's first term and i'm afraid we're going to do the next term ease back and you see when there a vacuum. people that don't share our interests diving into that vacuum. >> i traveled all over the middle east. every leader i talked to believe the united states is weak in leaving. they are having to accommodate to that eventuality. whether it be the saudis or you name the country they are accommodating to american weakness and withdrawal. that means that they accomm
russia -- go that far it is a remark am bold move. >> we give a lot of money to egypt, the second biggest recipient of bilateral aid from the united states, second only to israel. we considering releasing some emergency funds, now, what does that do? >>guest: what it does, it tells the world, and it certainly tells the egyptian people, th this new president, the second-term president we have, if -- in president obama; going to continue to support the muslim brotherhood and that is happening. there can be no other explanation. if there were, brenda, we cut it off and we tell them, no, you can't do that, there will be no aid unless you rescind the orders. >> we will watch this situation. former c.i.a. operative joins us. >> walmart protesters are demanding change. the union has their back. but does anyone have walmart? [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger
from france, russia as well as switzerland are going to open yasser araf arafat's grave. this will have big certificate remonth niall character. there's a religious ceremony. a military ceremony. and the same is happening when he is laid to rest again. the whole thing they say is all going to happen in one day so it won't take very long. what the palestinian authority has left open is how long the actual investigation of the sample is going to take. all of the samples are separately going to be taken to rue sharks france and switzerland to the labs there to be analyzed and it's unclear how long this analysis is going to take. however, if it does come to light that yasser arafat was poisoned with a radioactive substance that will cause massive emotional reactions here and already the investigation is a very emotional one for the investigators and for the palestinians as the lead investigator said in his press conference. >> translator: the 27th of november will be one of the most difficult days of my life because of many personal, national and symbolic considerations. but i consider it a
israel and the moss. no doubt about it. lou: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly working hard to prove the point. that is next. it up tomorrow, abc nws white house correspondent with his new book. we will be talking about that. former federal prosecutor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations among our guests. coming right up, the "a-team" on the reublican rebellion against what. who is this guy? grover norquist -- grover norquist. we use this board to compare car insurance rates side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that's progressive. call or click today. [ grunting ] but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i pluggein snapshot, and 30 days later, with snapshot, i knew what i could s
nations. security council members france, china and russia is the idea that by pursuing this vote they will strengthen the hands of the nod democrat palestinian president mahmoud abbas against the more militant hamas which saw its popularity rise in the wake of that recent conflict in gaza. the palestinian officials for their parts mean they are not looking for a fight here. they are simply trying to advance the cause of peace. listen. we are here to reinstate the two state solution and this we will do tomorrow afternoon. >> and that vote will take place around 3:00 p.m. eastern tomorrow afternoon on what the u.n. named several years ago international palestinian solidarity day. shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations death comes all too frequently now in syria. today it was twin bombings in the capital city of damascus. people ran after the first explosion and that's when the killers detonated a second bomb. nearly 50 people died. there is no word on who is behind the attack. it is but the latest in the bloody battle between syria's government and its rebels. rebel
in russia. >> sean: for example, if somebody is a virgin till they're married they're considered odd. people in greater numbers live together. >> right. >> sean: abortion on demand is settled, at least according to the polls -- you add gaymarriag. you're a pastor. those are things you disagree with, right? >> absolutely i disagree with. what i don't agree with is that the way to stop them is law. i tell you why. because by the time something gets into the water, it's already downstream. politics is always downstream from culture. when you start making a law to stop this, stop that, it's already in the culture. >> sean: you met president obama back in 2008. i know you don't like to get in politics. just say you don't want to answer if you don't want to answer. what do you think of him, how he's governed? >> i think
. >> john: you grew up in russia. >> grew up in russia. didn't have the hostess. came here. >> john: you eat only healthy food. >> that's right. other russian flavors hostess doesn't make. so i've steered clear. and my understanding is nobody really -- i don't really understand, nobody still eats hostess as a practice of -- if we want baked goods we buy hostess. am i wrong? >> john: no one eats hostess caifntle. >> they do eat the coast es cakes but it is not seen as a delicious dessert. >> john: it is. twinkies have a shelf life of seven years because they have so many preservatives in them. i want to feed someone nothing but twinkies the last ten years of their life and see how long it takes their body to decompose when they die. between twinkies and ho hos which dick morris is a fan and chock codials, i don't know if they make those anymore but the cupcakes are still huge. hostess sells wonder bread so maybe you don't have kids -- >> don't have kids. >> john: children still love this crap. >> childre
, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right
diplomacy. this is something that really works. i try to expand it to russia, which i think is kind of a cool idea, but got shut down by the embassy. but at any rate, it's a great idea, needs to be bigger. used to be the chairman of the bbc. has been impossible mission -- and possible because this has to do two things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile, although in my view it's an excellent job of records failing. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. number two, it is a real, journalistic institution that needs to abide by normal journalistic principles. so how can he do both of those the same time? well, it is hard especially if you have members of congress who don't understand what the law actually says. so i've actually come around to the view, which i never stated before and i kind of have resisted this for a long time. they really do think it needs to be much more -- needs to be brought into the broader foreign policy making apparatus of the united states government. otherwise i don't think it's going to survive. so i think that tension needs
the same way barack did. he went from labeling russia, which he recently called the soviet union, labeling russia are most significant geopolitical foe -- let me tell you something, he also was opposed to the new start treaty which every single solitary former republican secretary of state, republican national security adviser, republican secretary of defense was for. he was against it. he said he would have never supported it. all of a sudden -- i tell you. it is amazing. we can work with russia, we can be very close with russia. [laughter] he went from harshly criticizing us to saying we will and we will turn over for responsibility to the afghan military at the end of 2014. [applause] he went from saying we should never have set a timetable, he would not do that. i had a debate, too, with ryan. [applause] in my day, he was talking about more troops in the east, more americans would be there -- we should not have set a date. then along comes romney -- my generation has gone on the wings of a snow white dove, preaching -- preaching glove. i tell you what, it was just amazing. when asked,
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